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What We Read As Children

Hello there everyone!

Occasionally I get into conversations with my students about books. Actually, it happens often, and I love it when it does. Today, a student asked me the following:

Miss Tennant? When you were little, what were your favorite books?

First of all, I loved the fact that she asked me about my favorite books rather than my favorite book, but this question always gives me hives. For as long as I can remember, I have been a reader. As a child, when people would ask me what I was or what I wanted to be, I’d say a reader. But I can’t remember what I read or why I read it…or even what the first book was that I read all on my own.

Today was different, however. Suddenly, at least a dozen titles came swirling into my brain and it made me so happy I almost cried. My favorite books were as follows:

1. the stories of forest animals by Beatrix Potter – I had a collection of them and loved to have them read to me, to read them myself, or to read to others.
2. The Lorax by Dr. Seuss – It was a combination of the drawings, the colors, and the story. I was always very opinionated and liked a good cause.
3. The Nutcracker – As a ballerina, I liked to listen to this story, but I distinctly remember hating to read it by myself.
4. Charlotte’s Web – This was my favorite in kindergarten and well into 3rd grade.
5. The Harry Potter series – When I was in 4th grade, I discovered the magical world of Harry Potter and was infatuated (and still am).

So I guess my question is this:

What were your favorite books as children?

Cheers!

Bree

Up Late with Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adiche

This is a wonderful review that has inspired me to read Adiche’s “Americanah.”

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Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adiche, is one of those rare books that not only rocked my literary world, but also my personal world. I really believe every single person I know should read this, regardless of reading tastes or preferences.

Perhaps I should begin with my relationship as an Adiche fan.  I first heard of her from a fellow teacher at a summer NEH program taught at Central Michigan University by Dr. Maureen Eke.  We were discussing companion texts to Things Fall Apart, and someone recommended Purple Hibiscus, a novel by a young Nigerian woman that had similar themes. I promptly read it and then procured 10 copies to offer to my advanced students as an optional choice in my African literature unit. Many students wrote about Kambili’s struggle in their final synthesis essay for that assignment. Half a Yellow Sun also became popular among some…

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Bout of Books 10 Update 2

Good evening everyone!

I’m sad to report that I didn’t make much progress today. I continued some of Voyager, but did not get any further with The Lies of Locke Lamora. Tomorrow is a new day, however!

Cheers!

Bout of Books 10 Update #1

Hi there!

It’s Tuesday and I have accomplished something! Whoo! Here is my daily update:

On Monday, I started and finished Books Can Be Deceiving by Jenn McKinlay. It was a quick and easy read, rather painless, although a little cliched and bumpy at times. I also started reading both Voyager, which is over 800 pages and will not be finished this week, and The Book Thief.

Tuesday – started reading The Lies of Locke Lamora.

Accomplishments:

1. Books Can Be Deceiving by Jenn McKinlay

2. Voyager by Diana Gabaldon

3. The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

4. The Lies of Locke Lamora by Scott Lynch

5. Lost in a Good Book by Jasper Fforde

6. One for the Money by Janet Evanovich

7. Fangirl by Rainbow Powell

8. The Secret Crown by Chris Kuzneski

9. Undressing Mr. Darcy by Karen Doornebos

10. Of Grave Concern by Max McCoy

11. Stardust by Neil Gaiman

12. Bridget Jones’ Diary by Helen Fielding

Bout of Books 10 Goals

Hi Everyone,

As promised, here are my goals for this years Bout of Books Read-a-Thon!

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This year, time has been a little crunched and I’ve not been able to read near as much as I would like. However, I’m going to attempted to read each day – mainly in the evenings – even though I’m leaving for a four-day weekend vacation on Thursday. Who knows, maybe I’ll be able to read even more sitting under my favorite oak tree in Gettysburg?

My general yearly goal, each year, is to read one book a week, or 52 books per year. However, my Goodreads shelf is presently reminding me that I’m behind this year…three books behind. Therefore, I would like to read five books during the Bout of Books 10 Read-a-Thon. This will catch me up, and even get me a little ahead.

Here are some of the books I might choose to read:

1. Books Can Be Deceiving by Jenn McKinlay

2. Voyager by Diana Gabaldon

3. The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

4. The Lies of Locke Lamora by Scott Lynch

5. Lost in a Good Book by Jasper Fforde

6. One for the Money by Janet Evanovich

7. Fangirl by Rainbow Powell

8. The Secret Crown by Chris Kuzneski

9. Undressing Mr. Darcy by Karen Doornebos

10. Of Grave Concern by Max McCoy

11. Stardust by Neil Gaiman

12. Bridget Jones’ Diary by Helen Fielding

Obviously, I will not get to all of these books. If I do, it’ll be a miracle, but I do have some long amounts of time that I can devote to reading this week.

I will update you each day with books that I have read and/or started.

Cheers!

 

Bout of Books 10!

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Well, it’s that time of year again!! Last year, I participated on my own, but this year, I’m making it all official and joining! (Even though I’ll probably have less time to read.)

I haven’t quite thought of goals and the like – I need to look at my packed schedule and see what I can come up with. Keep your eyes peeled for a goal post (hahaha) soon!

 

Confessions of a Murder Suspect by James Patterson

I’m not one to read books by authors who put out more than two books a year (i.e. James Patterson, Dean Koontz, Stephen King) because they’re often plot-based and low on the intellectual stimulation radar.  That being said, I finally read one of this novel-writing powerhouse-writer’s books: Confessions of a Murder Suspect by James Patterson.

Why? Because it sounded interesting, many of my middle school students were reading it, and I got a copy of the book for free from the Book Fair.

Conclusion: It was good. Wonderful? No. Fantastic? No. Kept me guessing? Yes. Fast-paced? Yes. Character driven? Kind of.

I recommend reading it if you’re a fan of Kate Brian’s two series Private and Privilege, or if you’re into middle school level books.

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